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  • Finding the Perfect Dog Breed for You

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    Have you ever noticed that different types of dog breeds are associated with specific occupations or other ways of life? Think about it this way, we’ve often seen celebrities with a poofy purse puppy in a paparazzi snapshot or a showdog seen prancing around inside of an arena. This is a drastically different comparison to a German Shepherd located in the back of a police car. There’s also images of a Dalmatian on board a fire engine, a Saint Bernard heading up a snow-covered slope to rescue a stranded skier, or working dogs herding sheep in the field.

    An elderly couple may prefer a lazier lap dog compared to a growing family that may be seeking a more active playmate. Different animals have very unique characteristics and attributes that match them perfectly with their master(s) and a certain lifestyle they’ll eventually enjoy with them. When it comes to choosing the perfect pet, there’s a certain amount of research that needs to involve criteria with your chosen critter in order to ensure you find the best fit when it comes to a lifetime of happiness you’ll find with you and your precious pooch.

    Check It Out

    When it comes to choosing your future best friend, making a checklist of your requirements along with their attributes is lengthy at best. But it’s it’s not that difficult and best to do your homework first before acquiring your perfect, future best friend. For example, Labradors and Retrievers are excellent choices for active families with growing children, but they also need tons of space and a great deal of exercise.

    Check out this Dog Breed Selector from the AKC (American Kennel Club) that will ask you some specific questions about:

    • Where you live
    • Whether you reside in a house or apartment
    • How many children and/or dogs you already have
    • Your activity level
    • How much noise you can withstand
    • Whether you’re a neat freak or not very tidy

    Your answers will reveal breeds of all shapes and sizes that could be a match for you. They’ll also give you further information about that breed’s trainability, type of coat, barking levels, activity required, grooming necessary and more information about how they could fit into your life.

    The site also offers links to places where you may be able to locate purebred puppies that match a possible choice for you. But before you spend hundreds or even thousands of dollars on a pooch with papers, please consider visiting your local animal shelter or rescue organization. Remember that supporting breeders can be tied with possible puppy mills or other unsavory ways in which animals can be raised in unhealthy environments.

    Here at PET DEPOT we also offer pet adoptions in association with our local pet rescue partners. This way you’ll ensure that you’ll be giving a pet from your area a second chance at life and you’re already at the perfect location where you can find everything you need from feeding dishes to grooming supplies and more.

    *Written by Amber Kinglsey

  • Positive Reinforcement Training Tips

    They don’t call them “man’s best friend” for nothing! Domestic dogs have for thousands of years lived with humans in various capacities, from aiding in hunting to protecting livestock. In order to perform these functions, dogs learned to communicate with people and perform as their owners wished.

    Dogs are highly sensitive and responsive animals. They can tell when their owners are happy, sad, or nervous, and they may express these emotions themselves.

    Because dogs do have feelings, and intelligence that may be compared to that of a toddler (some breeds are as smart as a human seven-year-old!), it’s important that you refrain from treating your pet negatively. Continually shouting at a small child may scare him into submission, but it probably won’t make for a happy or healthy young person in the long run, even if he does obey.

    Your dog does not understand that you’re angry he got into the garbage bin; for one, dogs get into things because they’re dogs, and for two, his brain just isn’t going to connect your harsh tones and loud movements with all the fun he had with leftovers this afternoon. Just as with small children, dogs need to be coerced into behaving well with smiles and cheer.

    Your pet will understand when you’re unhappy with him, but he won’t understand why so well as the fact that you just are. That’s why it’s important to work on refining your dog’s behavior in a different way, with positivity.

    Positive reinforcement is one of the best methods of training your dog. It’s easier for your dog to understand what he did right, rather than grasping the concept of some arbitrary human rule he didn’t follow (such as resisting sticking his muzzle into the appealing-smelling trash bin). When you’re happy, your dog is happy as well.

    As such, two of the best ways to train your dog are with enthusiasm and with puppy treats. Both of these need to be awarded to your pet immediately after he performs the desirable action, so that he understands and repeats it again.

    Because dogs understand human emotions so well, it’s key to praise him when he does something correctly, even if it’s by accident. Use upbeat vocal tones, and repeated phrases like “Good dog!” Respond in this way when your dog completes commands, and pair it with petting and physical affection when you’re really proud.

    Treats are a great idea for training. Your pet gets a treat for sitting instead of jumping on visitor, for not barking when the doorbell rings, when he fetches an item, and so on. As long as they don’t trigger a food allergy, treats are a safe and effective way for modifying behavior and completing training. Be patient at first, since your dog probably won’t understand right away.

    It doesn’t take much to make dogs happy–pets and treats, please! Check out the infographic below for more on how to get your pet to please you with positive reinforcement.

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    *Written and designed by Amber Kingsley

  • Pet Obesity on the Rise for Sixth Straight Year

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    One of America’s most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight, and statistics show that pet owners should share that goal with their dogs and cats. Data from Nationwide, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, reveals that pet obesity is on the rise for the sixth straight year. In 2015, Nationwide members filed 1.3 million pet insurance claims for conditions and diseases related to pet obesity, equaling a sum of more than $60 million in veterinary expenses. The boost in total obesity-related claims signifies a 23 percent growth over the last three years.

    Similar to their human counterparts, excessive body fat increases the risk of preventable health issues and may shorten the life expectancy of dogs and cats. Nationwide recently sorted through its database of more than 585,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat obesity-related conditions. Below are the results:

    Most Common Dog Obesity-Related Conditions Most Common Cat Obesity-Related Conditions
    1.    Arthritis 1.     Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease
    2.   Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease 2.    Chronic Kidney Disease
    3.   Low Thyroid Hormone Production 3.    Diabetes
    4.   Liver Disease 4.    Asthma
    5.   Torn Knee Ligaments 5.    Liver Disease
    6.   Diabetes 6.    Arthritis
    7.   Diseased Disc in the Spine 7.    High Blood Pressure
    8.  Chronic Kidney Disease 8.   Heart Failure
    9.   Heart Failure 9.    Gall Bladder Disorder
    10.  Fatty Growth 10.   Immobility of Spine

    “Obesity can be detrimental to the livelihood of our pets,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for Nationwide. “Pet owners need to be aware of the quality and amount of food or treats they give their furry family members. The New Year presents a perfect opportunity to create regular exercise routines for our pets and begin to effectively manage their eating habits to avoid excess weight gain. Scheduling routine wellness exams with your veterinarian is the most effective way to get started on monitoring your pet’s weight, particularly for cats.”

    In 2015, Nationwide received more than 49,000 pet insurance claims for arthritis in canines, the most common disease aggravated by excessive weight, which carried an average treatment fee of $295 per pet. With more than 5,000 pet insurance claims, bladder or urinary tract disease was the most common obesity-related condition in cats, which had an average claim amount of $442 per pet.

    Below are simple steps you can take to help regulate your pet’s weight:

    • Avoid feeding your pet table scraps.
    • Keep a consistent diet by monitoring the amount of food you give your pet.
    • Regulate the amount of treats you give your pet.
    • Establish a healthy and fun exercise schedule.

    *Consult your veterinarian to best determine your pet’s weight loss protocol.

    *Source courtesy of Pet Age

  • Pet Travel: Take Your Furry Sidekick  Along, or Leave Him Behind?

    Adorable and soulful labrador mix ready to take the old car for a drive.

    As a pet parent, a road trip with a furry kid might seem like a dream come true. You’d love the opportunity to bond and share new experiences with him, and you’d certainly appreciate the company. But before you load your beloved pet into the car for the long haul, take a moment to reflect. A pet who’s a great companion at home, on walks, and on short trips around town won’t necessarily be an ideal travel buddy. Long trips aren’t right for every pet, and your pet’s needs should come before your desire to take him along.

    Does My Pet have a Road-Worthy Temperament?

    Like people, dogs have a wide range of different temperaments. Some are laid-back and easygoing, while others are nervous and high-strung. If your pet is adaptable, easy to please and likes new places and new people, he’s likely to be a great travel buddy.  However, if he’s nervous by nature, skittish about car rides, or anxious when confronted with something new, chances are, he’s not ready for a long trip. If your pet is nervous or fearful, don’t despair – with some training, he may eventually become a great pet traveler. He just may have to stay home this time around.

    With appropriate training, commitment,  and patience, most temperament problems can be overcome. Your pet can become less sensitive to stimuli, and more suited for travel. That said, desensitizing training techniques aren’t a quick fix. You’ll need to dedicate the time, offer a lot of leeway and understanding, and let your pet set the pace.

    Will This Trip be Fun for my Pet?

    Will your pet be comfortable? Did you plan pet friendly activities he will enjoy? Your dog might love an impromptu hiking trip through the mountains or a glorious day on the beach, but he may not be so thrilled to share your mother’s tiny apartment with her cats while you head off to the golf course or sit alone in a hotel room  during your out-of-town business meetings, (in fact, many pet friendly hotels don’t allow pets to stay alone in rooms). You know your dog best, so you are the best person to judge whether this trip will be an enjoyable one for him – if not, you can adjust your plans to be more pet friendly, or you can let him stay home where he’s sure to be comfortable.

    Is My Pet in Good Health?

    If your pet is injured or under-the-weather, you may be tempted to take him along on your trip so you can watch over him. After all, no one will care for him like you do! However, it may be best for your pet to stay behind under the care of trusted friend or family member. You will be busy driving, after all, and you won’t really keep vigil over him. The trip may make him tired, distressed or uncomfortable – factors that will be difficult to remedy far from home. A pet in pain or discomfort may even act out, which won’t make for a pleasant trip for either of you.

    If your pet is elderly, but in good health, you’ll need to make a judgment call. If he enjoys taking car trips and visiting new places, taking him along may very well be good for him. If he likes trips, but becomes uncomfortable easily, he may be better off at home. If you’re undecided, a quick trip to consult with your vet can help you figure out whether a road trip is in your pet’s best interest.

    If your pet suffers from travel anxiety, routinely taking him on brief trips, or planning occasional trips that end up somewhere exciting and fun can help teach him that traveling is a rewarding experience. If your pet experiences motion sickness during car rides, all is not lost – a number of remedies exist to help alleviate his suffering, including reconditioning, traditional medications, and holistic remedies.

    If your pet is up for it, hitting the road with him can be a fantastic way to break up the blahs, have some fun adventures, and spend some quality time together. However, even if your pet isn’t perfectly suited for travel right now, it doesn’t mean he never can be.

    Safe travels and happy tails!

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • Pets and Distracted Driving

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    With busy summer travel season in full force, many families are planning to hit the road with their families – and that of course, means their four-legged family members too. To ensure safe travels for everyone it’s important to take heed of a very real pet travel safety issue – pets and distracted driving.

    When we think of distracted driving, the typical “culprits” that come to mind include; texting, eating, applying makeup, chatting on the phone, or even daydreaming.  However, we seldom consider that traveling with an unsecured pet is a very real and dangerous distraction.

    AAA in conjunction with Kurgo conducted a survey of people who often drive with their pets. The survey showed that a whopping 64 percent of pet parents partake in unsafe distracted driving habits as they pertain to their pet.  Additionally, 29 percent of respondents admitted to being distracted by their four-legged travel companions, yet 84 percent indicated that they do not secure their pet in their vehicle. According to the survey, drivers were letting their dogs, putting them in their laps and giving them treats. Some drivers (three percent) even photographed their dogs while driving.

    It’s pretty easy to understand how an unsecured pet can be a distraction while driving. Some pets may become anxious or excited causing them to jump around or bark while in the vehicle. Additionally, a happy and loving pet may just want to be near you and crawl on your lap while driving.

    Oftentimes, pets can be frightened and there is always an element of unpredictability with any animal.  When looking for comfort dogs and cats may naturally opt to be near you and add to the possible perils caused by these distractions.

    Properly securing your pet in your vehicle is not only about alleviating this potential driving distraction that could cause an accident. It is also a proactive approach should there be an accident or sudden stop – even a fender bender can injure an unsecured pet. We wear seatbelts for our safety in case of an accident and should take the same care to secure our pets. A pet that is not restrained properly in a vehicle can be seriously harmed or even killed if thrown from a vehicle. Airbags can go off and injure a pet in your lap. In the event of an accident, frightened pets can easily escape from a vehicle and run off.  Further, a pet that is not properly secured may not only be harmed but could also put others in danger through the shear force of any impact from an accident.

    Ensuring your pet is safe while traveling in your vehicle means finding the pet safety restraint that is right for him. Options include pet seat belts, pet car seats, travel crates, and vehicle pet barriers. Planning to have the right pet safety restraint for your trip will not only keep you and your pet safe, but also offer you peace of mind and take one more distraction away.

    *Source courtesy of TripsWithPets.com

    About TripsWithPets.com
    TripsWithPets.com is the premier online pet friendly travel guide — providing online reservations at over 30,000 pet friendly hotels & accommodations across the U.S. and Canada. When planning a trip, pet parents go to TripsWithPets.com for detailed, up-to-date information on hotel pet policies and pet amenities. TripsWithPets.com also features airline & car rental pet policies, pet friendly activities, a user-friendly search-by-route option, as well as pet travel gear.

  • 5 Alternatives to Leaving Your Dog in the Car

    Bringing your dog with you while you run errands can be quite fun. But during summer, it can be a daunting task as the temperature begins to rise. The summer months can be quite harsh, especially on your pets. That’s why it is important to keep the car ventilated and your dog hydrated as to avoid heat exhaustion. These five alternatives can help to keep your pup safe during the hot months.

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    *Source Courtesy of Petfinder

  • Traveling With Pets

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    For some pet parents, a trip is no fun if the four-legged members of the family can’t come along. But traveling can be highly stressful, both for you and your pets. If you’re planning to take a trip with pets in tow, we have some tips to help ensure a safe and comfortable journey for everyone.

    Remember, no matter where you’re headed or how you plan to get there, make sure your pet is microchipped for identification and wears a collar and tag imprinted with your name, phone number and any relevant contact information. It’s a good idea for your pet’s collar to also include a temporary travel tag with your cell phone and destination phone number for the duration of your trip.

    Traveling by plane?
    Unless your furry friend is small enough to ride under your seat, it’s best to avoid air travel with your pets. If you must bring your pet along on the flight, here are a few suggestions to keep your pet safe while flying the friendly skies.

    • Book a direct flight whenever possible. This will decrease the chances that your pet is left on the tarmac during extreme weather conditions or mishandled by baggage personnel during a layover.
    • Make an appointment with your pet’s veterinarian for a checkup. Prior to your trip, make sure your pet’s vaccinations are up-to-date and obtain a health certificate from your veterinarian dated within 10 days of your departure. Tranquilizing your pet is generally not recommended as it could hamper his or her breathing, so use this time to check with your veterinarian for ways to relax your pet if you suspect he or she may become afraid, anxious or uncomfortable mid-flight. For travel outside of the continental United States, additional planning and health care requirements may be necessary. Contact the foreign office of the country you are traveling to for more information.
    • Purchase a USDA-approved shipping crate. The crate should be large enough for your pet to stand, sit and turn around in comfortably, and lined with some type of bedding—shredded paper or towels—to absorb accidents. Prior to your trip, tape a small pouch of dried food outside the crate so airline personnel will be able to feed your pet in case he or she gets hungry during a layover. The night before you leave, freeze a small dish or tray of water for your pet. This way, it can’t spill during loading and will melt by the time he or she is thirsty. Make sure the crate door is securely closed, but not locked, so that airline personnel can open it in case of an emergency.
    • Make sure your pet’s crate has proper identification. Mark the crate with the words “Live Animal,” as well as with your name, cell phone and destination phone number, and a photo of your pet. Should your pet escape from the carrier, this could be a lifesaver. You should also carry a photograph of your pet.
    • Tell every airline employee you encounter—on the ground and in the air—that you are traveling with a pet in the cargo hold. This way, they’ll be ready if any additional considerations or attention is needed. If the plane is delayed, or if you have any concerns about the welfare of your pet, insist that airline personnel check the animal whenever feasible. In certain situations, removing the animal from the cargo hold and deplaning may be warranted.

    Taking a Road Trip?
    Traveling with a pet by car involves more than just loading the animal in the back seat and motoring off, especially if you will be driving long distances or plan to be away for a long time. Here are a few car travel safety tips to help you prepare for a smooth and safe trip.

    • Prep your pet for a long trip. Get your pet geared up by taking him on a series of short drives first, gradually lengthening time spent in the car. If you’re traveling across state lines, bring along your pet’s rabies vaccination record. While this generally isn’t a problem, some states require this proof at certain interstate crossings.
    • Keep your pets safe and secure in a well-ventilated crate or carrier.The crate should be large enough for your pet to stand, sit, lie down and turn around in. Secure your pet’s crate so it will not slide or shift in the event of an abrupt stop. If you decide to forgo the crate, don’t allow your pet to ride with his head outside the window, and always keep him in the back seat in a harness attached to a seat buckle.
    • Prep a pet-friendly travel kit. Bring food, a bowl, leash, a waste scoop, plastic bags, grooming supplies, medication and first-aid, and any travel documents. Pack a favorite toy or pillow to give your pet a sense of familiarity. Be sure to pack plenty of water, and avoid feeding your pet in a moving vehicle. Your pet’s travel-feeding schedule should start with a light meal three to four hours prior to departure, and always opt for bottled water. Drinking water from an area he or she isn’t used to could result in stomach discomfort.
    • Never leave your animal alone in a parked vehicle. On a hot day, even with the windows open, a parked automobile can become a furnace in no time, and heatstroke can develop. In cold weather, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing the animal to freeze to death.

    *Source Courtesy of ASPCA

  • 8 Spring Dog Safety Tips

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    Spring is upon us and it’s time for you and your pup to enjoy the warmer weather. But there are some important things to remember to keep your furry friend happy and healthy. These 8 safety tips ensure that Spring doesn’t put a damper on your fun!

    1. Save the Sticks
    Sticks — now readily available after the winter thaw — can cause choking and severe injuries in dog’s mouths and throats. So if your dog likes to chew and chase, pack a Frisbee, tennis ball or other toy instead.

    2. Keep Fido Away from New Plants
    Many dogs like to eat grass, but if your dog likes to chew on other plants, now’s the time to get out your plant guide. Some native plants can cause vomiting, diarrhea or even death, so before you let your pooch chomp down on those leafy greens, check out this guide to toxic and non-toxic plants.

    3. Use Pet-Friendly Products for Spring Cleaning
    Spring cleaning is the perfect occasion to review your cleaning product’s pet-friendliness. If the bottles do not say their contents are dog-safe, it’s best to keep these products where your dog can’t get them. If your dog does ingest a household cleaner, the Chicago Veterinary Medical Association recommends you, “do not call a human poison control center; they do not have any information on pets. Instead, contact your veterinarian and/or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Hotline (888-426-4435) for accurate information.”

    4. Watch Your Dog for Signs of Seasonal Allergies
    Some dogs develop allergies to common seasonal plants, like ragweed. But, unlike people, these allergies usually present as skin problems in dogs, according to Dr. Stephanie Janeczko D.V.M. in How Do I Know if My Dog Has Allergies?

    “Because dogs with atopy [inhaled allergies] are frequently allergic to pollens and grasses, they often have a seasonality to their symptoms but can show signs all year long if they are allergic to something that is always in the environment (such as dust mites),” says Dr. Janeczko.

    5. Hide the Antifreeze
    Cars use antifreeze year-round, so you always need to stay vigilant to keep your pup safe. Many dogs like the taste of antifreeze because it’s sweet, but it’s also deadly. Contact your vet immediately if you suspect your dog’s been exposed.

    6. Start Flea and Tick Prevention Early
    The American Heartworm Association now recommends keeping dogs on year-round flea and tick preventatives to guard against heartworm disease. If your dog is not already on a preventative regimen, now is the time to start.

    7. Prevent Dog-Park Bullying By Knowing the Signs
    As the weather gets warmer, you may be bringing your dog to the dog park more often. Make sure it’s a safe and fun time for all by knowing the symptoms of bullying and how to deal with them.

    8. Keep Artificial Sweeteners Away from Your Dog
    Springtime and Easter go hand in hand and that means plenty of chocolate and other dangerous dog treats. Keep your pup safe as you celebrate spring by keeping all sweets, candies and gum away from your dog. While many people know about the dangers of chocolate, only a small amount of the common artificial sweetener xylitol can be deadly.

    *Source Courtesy of Petfinder

  • 5 Easy Ways to Save on Vet Costs

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    Being a responsible doggy parent takes a great deal of commitment – and often times a great deal of expense. Not only does your furry best friend require your time and attention, he or she also needs regular veterinary care. Caring for a dog isn’t just about putting out food and providing shelter – it’s usually a 10 to 20 year commitment that includes vaccinations, medications, and other expenses, especially as your pup reaches her senior years.

    Fortunately, there are simple preventative measures you can take that help cut your costly vet expenses, without sacrificing your dog’s well-being. In fact, by following these tips, you’ll not only save money, but you’ll help your dog live a healthier and happier life! You see, preventative care is the best way to keep your dog healthy as she ages.

    1. Spay or Neuter Your Dog
    Besides preventing unwanted litters of puppies, spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer in female dogs and keeps them from going into heat. Neutering prevents testicular cancer in male dogs and curbs their desire to escape and roam away from home. Altered pets tend to be much better behaved animals, too.

    So how does spaying or neutering save money on vet bills? Well the cost of this surgery is far less than the cost of raising litters of puppies and the cost of treating medical conditions like infections, cancers, or even injuries that may arise from unaltered dogs who escape their yards. Save even more money by searching for low-cost spay/neuter clinics in your area!

    2. Stay Current on Vaccines and Other Preventatives
    If you stay on top of vaccines and parasite prevention, you’re much less likely to incur vet expenses down the road from illnesses that are easily preventable!

    You shouldn’t wait for your dog to become infested with parasites. Instead, use flea and tick preventatives and, if you’re in an area of the country where mosquitos are a concern, use heartworm preventative, too. Call the animal control organization in your area or your veterinarian to inquire about low-cost vaccination options.

    3. Practice Good Hygiene
    Believe it or not, grooming and cleanliness can prevent infection. Start trimming your dog’s nails on a regular basis when he’s a puppy. Get a great pair of nail trimmers and get him used to having his paws handled at a young age so that the process is easy for both of you. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly or use dental cleaning water or food additives to keep your pup from developing plaque and gum disease. Use an ear cleaner or ear wipes to keep your dog’s ears clean and dry.

    4. Provide and Excellent Diet and Adequate Exercise
    Keep your dog at her ideal weight. More than half the dogs in the United States are either overweight or obese! Excess weight in your dog can lead to such health problems as Diabetes, high blood pressure, heart and respiratory disease, joint disorders, kidney disease, some forms of cancer, and decreased life expectancy. All of these issues can lead to costly vet bills. The best thing to do is keep your furkid at a healthy weight, and the best way to do that is through a healthy diet and daily mental and physical stimulation.

    5. Dog-Proof Your House
    Protect your pup from potential household hazards by taking certain precautions that could prevent costly emergency trips to the veterinarian. Store your medications in tightly closed containers. Keep chemicals like household cleaners out of her reach, make sure your dog doesn’t have access to chew on your electrical cords, and be sure you don’t have toxic plants in your home.

    Remember, preventing an accident, illness, or disease is always more cost effective than treating one!

    *Source Courtesy of The Dogington Post